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RIcky Ranger

Bad Fuel Injector 2019 Ranger

Question

My brand new Ranger’s Check Engine Light came on at about 380 miles. I took it to the dealership and the service technician cleared the alert. He drove a couple of new Rangers on his lot and reported a pronounced hesitation at lower speeds. I told them I had experienced the same behavior. Ford Corporate was contacted and the tech was directed to check the fuel injectors. Low and behold, the #2 fuel injector   Needs to be replaced. The service writer called to tell me there are no replacement parts available per his ordering system. 

Does anyone have an educated guess as to how long it will take to get the part out here to California and when I’ll be getting my truck back? 

Bonus point questions:

How many fuel injectors does my Ranger have? 

If one fuel injector  is bad is it indicative that the others will have problems? 

Edited by RIcky Ranger
Misspelled word

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Me too Ricky, but I can't help from being disappointed and getting discouraged. I ended up not hearing a thing yesterday. I'm wondering if the engineers don't have "bigger fish to fry". Besides the lawsuit over the mpg now the big recall over seperate transmission issues of the Fusion and Ranger.

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I don't know who you are referring to, but I have not posted anything about this anywhere else. 

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16 minutes ago, CaseyKasey said:

I don't know who you are referring to, but I have not posted anything about this anywhere else. 

Not you CK....Ricky Ranger

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1 hour ago, twintornados said:

Nice to see you a complaining about it on every forum you can find....

https://www.ranger5g.com/forum/threads/bad-fuel-injector.2794/

Oh lay off.  I post the same things I post here on that forum all the time.  I'd be posting about my issues if I were him as well. 

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Just now, Anthony said:

Oh lay off.  I post the same things I post here on that forum all the time.  I'd be posting about my issues if I were him as well. 

yawn.....

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2 hours ago, CaseyKasey said:

Me too Ricky, but I can't help from being disappointed and getting discouraged. I ended up not hearing a thing yesterday. I'm wondering if the engineers don't have "bigger fish to fry". Besides the lawsuit over the mpg now the big recall over seperate transmission issues of the Fusion and Ranger.

Understand that even after they identify the problem they have to come up with a fix, write the TSB, test it, etc. and in this case they have to make sure it gets fixed for all the new trucks as well.  And they may have to work with the supplier if it's a supplier issue.   There is a lot more to it than just replace a part.

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8 minutes ago, Anthony said:

Oh lay off.  I post the same things I post here on that forum all the time.  I'd be posting about my issues if I were him as well. 

Agreed.  This one is criticism well deserved.

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20 minutes ago, akirby said:

Agreed.  This one is criticism well deserved.

Everyone is entitled to an opinion.....including me. 

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2 hours ago, RIcky Ranger said:

I got my Ranger back today. It is running smooth as silk. I am over the moon happy. 

I am glad for you and wish you nothing but years of driving enjoyment. It sucks you had to go through what you went through...what is Ford doing to compensate you for your time?

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Ricky, please tell me the details. Up through yesterday I am still getting the same thing...the service manager and his 'driveability' master technician had more conference calls w/the Ford engineers aware of my issue. They are trying to tell me that there is  (in layman's terms) a break in period and that it's not necessarily based upon the number of miles driven, but the number of "cycles". And that the drive will get better as there are more "cycles" of driving and the computer learns.

What I say is, IF that is true,  then they should get those "cycles" on the engine/vehicle before putting it out for retail and frustrating customers by asking them to spend $40K on a rough driving truck waiting for the "cycles" to smooth things out...or for the CEL to come on, so they can say oh? that was it! 

So now, I picked it up last Friday and rove it 25 miles home then got up Saturday and rove it 25 miles back and that's it. They have had it ever since and they admit nothing has changed for the better. They want me to take it and put the "cycles" on it instead of them...still implying there is learning between the computer and the driver (habits/style?). I think it's ridiculous and insulting to be asked to be a "test monkey" especially when it's costing me $850+ a month.

Am I angry...yes, and also at myself...so a piece of advice to anyone still waiting for theirs to come in: make sure you take a good test drive before going to the delivery office. I swear, if I had, I would have given them this week to get it running to my satisfaction or I would walk away from the $1,000 ordering deposit. At 70, piece of mind is worth every penny. 

By the way, What is Job 1 at Ford ??? 

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4 hours ago, CaseyKasey said:

By the way, What is Job 1 at Ford ???

Beginning of production. 

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12 hours ago, twintornados said:

I am glad for you and wish you nothing but years of driving enjoyment. It sucks you had to go through what you went through...what is Ford doing to compensate you for your time?

Don’t know, that conversation will happen next week. 

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I'm wondering if this was done...or if Ford engineers didn't suggest it, so it wasn't?

Troubleshooting the fuel-injection system in the Ford Ranger can be a daunting task. Understanding how the system functions makes this system easier to diagnose and repair. High-pressure fuel is supplied to the fuel injector by the fuel pump. Just before and during the opening of the intake valve, an electrical pulse is sent to the injector and the injector opens to allow fuel to be sprayed into the cylinder. Diagnosing the system includes checking fuel supply and electrical function.

 

Step 1

Attach the fuel-pressure tester gauge to the test port on the fuel rail attached to the injectors. Cycle the ignition key from off to on several times to pressurize the system. System pressure should be greater that 45 psi. If no fuel pressure develops in the system, the most likely causes are the fuel-pump fuse, fuel-pump relay, or fuel pump.

Step 2

Check the fuel-pump fuse at the the under-hood fuse block using the circuit tester. If the fuse is good, have a helper turn the ignition key to the start position and check for power supply at the fuel-pump electrical connector located near the rear of the fuel tank on the frame. If power is supplied to the pump but the pump doesn't come on, replace the pump. If no power is supplied to the pump, replace the fuel-pump relay. If fuel pressure is normal go to the next step.

 

Step 3

Unplug one of the wiring-harness connectors attached to the fuel injectors. Plug the injector-harness tester into the harness connector. Have a helper turn the ignition key to the start position while you observe the tester. If the tester does not flash during cranking, check for power at the harness. One wire of the connector should be power and the other should be ground during cranking. Check the fuses if there is no power. Replace the ignition module if there is power supplied to the injector but no ground during cranking.

If the engine runs, but has a misfire, test the injector by measuring the resistance of the injector. Remove the wiring connector from the injector and touch the leads of the digital volt/ohmmeter to the pins in the injector. Readings of 0 ohms indicate a shorted injector and readings of infinite resistance indicate an open injector. Resistance values of 10 to 16 ohms are normal.

Items you will need

  • Fuel-pressure test set
  • Automotive circuit tester
  • Injector-harness tester (noid light)
  • Digital volt/ohmmeter
 

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That is the fuel tube that runs between the HPFP and the HP rail. It is "one time use" per Ford. They changed policy recently, and if "one time use" parts are not replaced they will deny the claim. We are having a LOT of issues stemming from this policy.  

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On 5/19/2019 at 6:14 AM, CaseyKasey said:

I'm wondering if this was done...or if Ford engineers didn't suggest it, so it wasn't?

Your post is to check NON- Direct injected fuel systems on old body (2012 and back) Rangers. DI fuel systems are different and have more factors that must be taken into account. 

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My mistake. I found it while searching for answers.

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