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bobbyd

Cmax Oil Change

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I've been getting my Cmax Oil changes completed at the dealer and really didn't notice the 'shop 'supplies' charge for $2.10! I was told the breakdown of charges were $5.33 for oil filter (FL-910S) ...$25.20 for the 0W20 oil ....labor $15.02....and the $2.10 for 'shop supplies' (towels or rags to wipe the installers hands! I never heard of that one before! 

I also noticed how I've been changing my oil every 4000-5000 miles. I decided to read more about the required interval on changing Cmax Hybrid oil. Surprised to discover I can have my oil changed every 7500-10000 miles under normal driving conditions! 

 

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1 minute ago, bobbyd said:

I've been getting my Cmax Oil changes completed at the dealer and really didn't notice the 'shop 'supplies' charge for $2.10! I was told the breakdown of charges were $5.33 for oil filter (FL-910S) ...$25.20 for the 0W20 oil ....labor $15.02....and the $2.10 for 'shop supplies' (towels or rags to wipe the installers hands! I never heard of that one before! 

I also noticed how I've been changing my oil every 4000-5000 miles. I decided to read more about the required interval on changing Cmax Hybrid oil. Surprised to discover I can have my oil changed every 7500-10000 miles under normal driving conditions! 

 

Shop supplies are a normal charge. It does include cleaner such as brake cleaner to spray off any oil residue. However, I don’t complain about it too much. For $47.65 I suppose you got the works package that rotates the tires as well. Go to a quick lube and just an oil change without rotation will be more than that. Add a rotate and it’s over $60 for same service. 

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4 hours ago, fordtech1 said:

Shop supplies are a normal charge. It does include cleaner such as brake cleaner to spray off any oil residue. However, I don’t complain about it too much. For $47.65 I suppose you got the works package that rotates the tires as well. Go to a quick lube and just an oil change without rotation will be more than that. Add a rotate and it’s over $60 for same service. 

It's was $50 and didn't include the tire rotation. It's called Quik Lane here in Wisconsin! Just hybrid oil and filter.....any rotation or maintenance check is extra! I'm definitely going to extend the intervals longer than 5000 miles, since I'm not pulling my trailers or anything other than normal driving!  It's a great car!!

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Just use the iOLM. When it says to change it, change it. 

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11 minutes ago, YT90SC said:

Just use the iOLM. When it says to change it, change it. 

You know I’m conflicted about going off the oil life monitor. Reason being, if you go by that it can be 7500 -10000. So the tires go 10,000 without rotating. Which in my experience can promote accelerated uneven wear on the tires. Also, if your vehicle uses oil, which a small amount isn’t abnormal, you may have to add some between services. If ford put oil level indicators in the vehicles and brake pad indicators, then I would be more inclined to go by it’s recommendations. 

Now if miles are racked up quickly, say a 30k a year customer that’s seems logical to go by the olm. But some folks 10-15k a year, means your car gets serviced once a year maybe twice. I see the worst of the worst so I’m overly cautious. 

 

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Typically, I 100% agree, and wouldn't recommend using the iOLM either, but it's a C-Max, so my thoughts differ on it than a standard non-hybrid. That being said, I have to admit that I don't use the iOLM On my wife's C-Max either. Her drive cycle puts her at about 7k miles as the desired interval, apparently, because I usually forget to reset it at 5000 when I do the service. This gets me a call, whenever, wherever it happens. 

As for rotations, I usually do 10k (every second oil change for me) on it anyway. The hard ass low rolling resistance tires wear like iron. It's just under 60k and we just replaced the set because she ruined one, had enough tread difference that I wasn't comfortable, and the replacement tires were very reasonable with all the benefits added in.

Brake checks are important, but with regenerative I'm not sure we will EVER put brakes on this damn thing as long as the rotors don't rot apart.  

Again, vastly different from our non-hybrid vehicles. 5k miles on my beater Focus because I do roll quite a few miles (about 3 months). Everything else 3k or time based oil changes because I don't put enough miles on. Rotations every oil change for the Focus, every other for the 3k/time based vehicles.   

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12 hours ago, YT90SC said:

Typically, I 100% agree, and wouldn't recommend using the iOLM either, but it's a C-Max, so my thoughts differ on it than a standard non-hybrid. That being said, I have to admit that I don't use the iOLM On my wife's C-Max either. Her drive cycle puts her at about 7k miles as the desired interval, apparently, because I usually forget to reset it at 5000 when I do the service. This gets me a call, whenever, wherever it happens. 

As for rotations, I usually do 10k (every second oil change for me) on it anyway. The hard ass low rolling resistance tires wear like iron. It's just under 60k and we just replaced the set because she ruined one, had enough tread difference that I wasn't comfortable, and the replacement tires were very reasonable with all the benefits added in.

Brake checks are important, but with regenerative I'm not sure we will EVER put brakes on this damn thing as long as the rotors don't rot apart.  

Again, vastly different from our non-hybrid vehicles. 5k miles on my beater Focus because I do roll quite a few miles (about 3 months). Everything else 3k or time based oil changes because I don't put enough miles on. Rotations every oil change for the Focus, every other for the 3k/time based vehicles.   

 

 

What do you set your tire pressure at? I'm set by the dealer recommended at 38 PSI!

Edited by bobbyd

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I always set to plackard. I'm fairly sure it's 38 on mine too. 

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Set my tires at 50 lbs.  Ok by Michelin, called the 1-800 number (the max is 51 lbs).  There's a reason they put the limit at 51 lbs...and why Ford used those tires (to reach the EPA mileage numbers!).  Been doing it for decades with all my cars (Fords).  Look at the tire and put it just below the max. If the ride is too hard then back off a little.  Huge difference in gas mileage (rolling resistance).  

The car placards aren't tire specific (how could they know what tires you have?).   I know if my tires are low: if the car rolls slightly in the garage before I start (neutral) then it's OK.  If it just sits there, check the pressure and inflate as needed.  Have a hand pump - very easy to do.  It's always in the car in case a tire deflates I need to try to get to a repair place and today it's hard to find pumps any where. 

And that toy Ford put in your car to inflate your tire is a joke and not worth the weight even.  If I'm going a long distance I carry a spare tire on a wheel ready to go with a jack, etc. 

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19 hours ago, Rick S. said:

Set my tires at 50 lbs.  Ok by Michelin, called the 1-800 number (the max is 51 lbs).  There's a reason they put the limit at 51 lbs...and why Ford used those tires (to reach the EPA mileage numbers!).  Been doing it for decades with all my cars (Fords).  Look at the tire and put it just below the max. If the ride is too hard then back off a little.  Huge difference in gas mileage (rolling resistance).  

The car placards aren't tire specific (how could they know what tires you have?).   I know if my tires are low: if the car rolls slightly in the garage before I start (neutral) then it's OK.  If it just sits there, check the pressure and inflate as needed.  Have a hand pump - very easy to do.  It's always in the car in case a tire deflates I need to try to get to a repair place and today it's hard to find pumps any where. 

And that toy Ford put in your car to inflate your tire is a joke and not worth the weight even.  If I'm going a long distance I carry a spare tire on a wheel ready to go with a jack, etc. 

After reading your advice I inflated my CMax tire pressure from 38 PSI to 45 PSI. The ride and gas mileage is noticeably better. Thanks for the tip!

 

 

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Try 50 lbs.  The OEM Michelins ride very well at 50 lbs.  I was surprised as my Focus Michelins give you a pretty hard ride at close to max pressure but the C-Max rides very nicely (most people don't notice and that includes my wife).  Paul Jones, the C-Max guru over at the 'other' C-Max forum, says he gets his Michelins to 60k miles and could go further but if winter is nearing he gets new ones.  My Focus is very sensitive to tire pressure in terms of mileage and it's frustrating when the garage techs decide to 'properly' inflate them for me.  They tell you the car 'rides better', which is true, but you lose a lot of mpgs. 

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A shop must inflate to placard this to avoid litigation. Over inflation will decrease the contact patch of the tire, which does decrease rolling resistance. However due to the contact patch being reduced you reduce the ability of the tire to maintain grip, which is not good if you have to make a sudden lane change, or environmental issues like rain, snowing, etc. It also wears the center of the tire (especially on Michelin) faster, reducing its life.

On a personal note, I *HATE* French tires. Only tire I've ever personally had quality issues with. Was SUPER glad to get rid of them on my wife's C-Max.   

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22 hours ago, YT90SC said:

A shop must inflate to placard this to avoid litigation. Over inflation will decrease the contact patch of the tire, which does decrease rolling resistance. However due to the contact patch being reduced you reduce the ability of the tire to maintain grip, which is not good if you have to make a sudden lane change, or environmental issues like rain, snowing, etc. It also wears the center of the tire (especially on Michelin) faster, reducing its life.

On a personal note, I *HATE* French tires. Only tire I've ever personally had quality issues with. Was SUPER glad to get rid of them on my wife's C-Max.   

I have Michelin tires and agree with everything you said about the wear. However, I clearly noticed the edges of the tires wearing while at 38 PSI for the past 9,000 miles (including a tire rotation). Now, at the higher PSI I will assume I can wear the center of the tire more than the edges which might extend its over life ,since its more of a balanced wear. ( I've definitely increased my MPG with the increased PSI. The Cmax is a heavy vehicle...and I  love her!)

Edited by bobbyd

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