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blwnsmoke

Ford F-150 engine tech stolen from MIT profs, lawsuit claims

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Yeah, I read this last week over on GMI.  Sounded to me like this was developed for a different application and Ford used a different application of it on something else, but they want to try to get credit.

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I seem to recall that the tech they were working on involved using gasoline in the direct injection system and ethanol in the port injection system (or the other way around). So it wasn't just dual injection... it was dual fuel system. This was right around the time rumour and speculation were swirling about some Coyote engine. I think the dual fuel engine was "Bobcat" (It was).

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you mean Ford nor anybody hasn't already had some kind of dual port and direct injection long before?

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18 hours ago, Joe771476 said:

you mean Ford nor anybody hasn't already had some kind of dual port and direct injection long before?

I think the real issue is using different fuels in addition to DI and PI.

Ethanol/methanol injection is "old hat".  It was done on aircraft engine prior to WWII.  Works well, until you run out of alcohol !

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Oh! 10 years after Ford launch their first EcoBoost they claimed this?  Really?

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You know building a good truck engine isn't rocket science.

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There's no doubt that Ford is using a simplified, single fuel  version of that technology but if it was a collaboration, then this is not the same as stolen technology. While  MIT didn't get as much money as it expected from Ford, Ford is not completely capitalizing on the full benefits of the original work which was all about replacing diesel engines by using E85 to suppress detonation in forced induction engines using regular gasoline (87). Ultimately, that technology proved unnecessary as it cost almost as much as a diesel engine anyway.

Edited by jpd80

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