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jcartwright99

2017 Fusion Transmission Maintence

Question

With 30,000 miles rapidly approaching in my 2017 Fusion 2.0, I decided to start looking around at the maintenance schedule and what would be needed in severe driving. I living in the Chicago area and in stop and go traffic all the time and sometimes can really drive aggressive so I wanted to make sure I did my part to ensure my transmission has a long life. Ford Quicklane recommended that I do a trans flush. However, on a Fusion forum everyone seems to recommend a drain and fill around 30,000 or every year in some cases. Some say flushes can be counter productive with that transmission. 

The most recommended process I've read is something a do it yourselfer could do pretty easily. Drain the fluid and replace amount drained with new Ford (or Amsoil) fluid. Do this 3 times to ensure all fluid has been changed. In between each time drive about 1k. Theoritcally, your fluid will be completely changed. Repeat process every 30,000 miles.

Now, I know it's the internet and everyone has their way of doing things so what works for some might not work for others. Does anyone know any negative effects of doing a flush with this transmission?  What are the benefits of just doing a drain and fill? It of course has no dipstick to check fill which is annoying. Any thoughts or first hand experience is appreciated.

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Power flushes aren’t recommended but I think the best option is the fluid exchange system the dealers use.  It uses the transmission pump (with the engine running) to exchange the fluid using the cooler lines.  The old fluid goes into the tank and it gets replaced with new fluid through the return line.  This changes over 95% of the fluid including what’s in the torque converter and it won’t do any damage because it’s using the normal pump pressure and flow direction.   I think the last time I checked it was about $175.

 

Some say you only need to do it at 60K but I have a friend who is a former Ford tranny engineer who does his that way every 30K.

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5 hours ago, akirby said:

Power flushes aren’t recommended but I think the best option is the fluid exchange system the dealers use.  It uses the transmission pump (with the engine running) to exchange the fluid using the cooler lines.  The old fluid goes into the tank and it gets replaced with new fluid through the return line.  This changes over 95% of the fluid including what’s in the torque converter and it won’t do any damage because it’s using the normal pump pressure and flow direction.   I think the last time I checked it was about $175.

 

Some say you only need to do it at 60K but I have a friend who is a former Ford tranny engineer who does his that way every 30K.

Thanks! I will probably go with flush from Ford. It doesn't help that it is about 20 degrees out right now, and I would be working on cold concrete garage floor if I did the drain and fill.

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6F35 has several Achilles' heels, and one of the biggest is TCC wear debris. If I owned a 6F35 ANYTHING, I would drain and fill. Flushing changes the fluid only, and will not remove anything that won't clear the filter. At least with drain and fill, you stand a chance to remove at least a little of the TCC clutch debris. You're probably not going to get much of the debris out, but some is better than none. Given the opportunity, I would take the side pan off too and clean it out there, but the 2.0 kind of sucks to do that to.  

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My buddy the old tranny engineer says if there is enough debris to clog the filter the tranny is already toast.

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In general, I never do ANYTHING with transmission fluid !  I have a 21 year E150 that still has the original fluid.

If you insist on doing something drop the pan.  Change the filter if "it make you feel good". While the pan is down, weld in a reinforcement for a proper drain plug.  If you simply replace the fluid in the pan every 50K or less, that transmission would be living the good life !

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8 hours ago, theoldwizard said:

In general, I never do ANYTHING with transmission fluid !  I have a 21 year E150 that still has the original fluid.

If you insist on doing something drop the pan.  Change the filter if "it make you feel good". While the pan is down, weld in a reinforcement for a proper drain plug.  If you simply replace the fluid in the pan every 50K or less, that transmission would be living the good life !

Your 21 year old van doesn't have Mercon LV in it. Nor is it VERY hard on fluid like 6F35, nor does it modulate the TCC to dampen NVH and thus produce copious amounts of wear material that clogs filters. 

6F35 does not have a removeable sump pan, nor is the filter serviceable in chassis. 

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21 hours ago, akirby said:

My buddy the old tranny engineer says if there is enough debris to clog the filter the tranny is already toast.

The 6F35 has a tiny filter, coupled with a TCC strategy that produces HUGE amounts of debris. The service filter has more magnetic surface area which helps slow the inevitable. Filtration failure often occurs in 6F35 and/or mass amounts of too tiny to filter debris gets in critical areas like solenoids, the solenoid pressure control valve in the main control, or accelerating wear on the case half differential thrust washer area or clutch tower/direct drum. 

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