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blwnsmoke

18 Explorer rated Poor in front crash test

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I hate these stupid articles but when you read something like this...

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/11/popular-ford-and-jeep-suvs-rated-as-poor-in-latest-crash-tests.html?__source=yahoo%7Cfinance%7Cheadline%7Cstory%7C&par=yahoo&yptr=yahoo

 

Somebody who is considering buying a brand new SUV, I would recommend that they choose something other than the Grand Cherokee or the Explorer," said Dave Zuby, senior vice president of vehicle research at Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. "There are clearly better choices out there especially if you are concerned about the safety of your family."

We know the new Explorer is coming but why the 18 and not the 16 or 17? Edited by blwnsmoke

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I hate these stupid articles but when you read something like this...

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/11/popular-ford-and-jeep-suvs-rated-as-poor-in-latest-crash-tests.html?__source=yahoo%7Cfinance%7Cheadline%7Cstory%7C&par=yahoo&yptr=yahoo

 

We know the new Explorer is coming but why the 18 and not the 16 or 17?

Its the same thing that happened to the Escape. The standard changed and the car didnt change with it.

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There are lots of reasons other than IIHS passenger side small overlap crash results to avoid Ford Explorer. It's just old and outclassed. The 20 year Volvo bones are weak.

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10 years ago it would have been rated safe and probably a top safety pick. To say it's now unsafe is utterly ridiculous. I understand it's a relative rating but the language being used is completely misleading.

 

Can't really blame Ford for not spending the big bucks to fix the current platform with a new one just around the corner.

 

Show me real world data that says more people are injured or killed in Explorers or JGCs than other vehicles and maybe I'll pay attention.

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Show me real world data that says more people are injured or killed in Explorers or JGCs than other vehicles and maybe I'll pay attention.

It's a one of but a coworker was in a bad accident (offset head on) with his CX-9. His injuries are almost exactly what the IIHS said they would be. He was hit by a teenage girl in a Highlander when she dropped her phone between the seats while she was texting and was looking for it.

 

Edited by jasonj80

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Quote

 

Somebody who is considering buying a brand new SUV, I would recommend that they choose something other than the Grand Cherokee or the Explorer," said Dave Zuby, senior vice president of vehicle research at Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. "There are clearly better choices out there especially if you are concerned about the safety of your family profits of your insurance provider."

 

Fixed it.

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10 years ago it would have been rated safe and probably a top safety pick. To say it's now unsafe is utterly ridiculous. I understand it's a relative rating but the language being used is completely misleading.

Like I said, the standard changed but the car didnt. The same thing happened with the Escape earlier this year. We all came to the same conclusion, new one on the way next year, not much reason to spend the money and change it.

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10 years ago it would have been rated safe and probably a top safety pick. To say it's now unsafe is utterly ridiculous. I understand it's a relative rating but the language being used is completely misleading.

 

Can't really blame Ford for not spending the big bucks to fix the current platform with a new one just around the corner.

 

Show me real world data that says more people are injured or killed in Explorers or JGCs than other vehicles and maybe I'll pay attention.

I seen to remember all of us having an argument a while back about the panthers (one of many haha). The usual contingency thought it was a very safe car because it's big and heavy, is cheap to insure, and most people seem to know someone who's walked away from a crash in a panther unscathed. The other contingency was convinced it was a death trap and got cancelled because it couldn't meet the 2012 safety regs.

 

Your post above makes it sound like you're switching sides in that argument?

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I don't think we said it couldn't be made to meet 2012 safety regs. We said it wasn't worth the cost and effort to do it.

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New vehicles are extremely safe by historical standards. This hardly makes the current Explorer a death trap. (If you want to a real eye-opener, google "1950s car accidents." Warning - it's not for the faint of heart.)

 

Based on media reports of accidents around here, most fatalities occur because the occupants didn't bother buckling their safety belt. Lately, it seems as though every local fatality has been the result of an occupant being ejected from the vehicle during a rollover crash.

Edited by grbeck

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Ford and FCA have long struggled in these tests and part of that is the extreme age of their technologies and platforms, and part of that is just prioritization. Ford and FCA just keep their platforms around for WAY too long and keep updating the tangibles instead of the foundations. Hopefully this will change in a few years but even their newest products have been underperforming in these tests so I'm not sure Ford has been able to crack this code yet, but they have to be getting closer. Ford is definitely a company that benefits from closer scrutiny because they like to cut corners, especially on safety engineering. The 2015 F-150 actually had optional structural safety members that weren't disclosed to the consumers which the IIHS revealed and it made a massive difference in the test and it motivated Ford to make them standard. I don't mind if Ford is not interested in meeting the IIHS tests, I just want to know about them since it's something I do care about. It's one of the reasons I only buy Lincolns since they tend to be the only Ford products that score well but I suspect Ford will always be something of a struggler when it comes to IIHS testing since they take a very reactionary position instead of a proactive one. I think their priority has always been NHTSA and what their customers care about, which may not be safety score related.

Edited by Assimilator

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How long did Toyota keep the platform under the previous-generation Camry? How long has the Corolla platform been around?

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New vehicles are extremely safe by historical standards. This hardly makes the current Explorer a death trap. (If you want to a real eye-opener, google "1950s car accidents." Warning - it's not for the faint of heart.)

 

Based on media reports of accidents around here, most fatalities occur because the occupants didn't bother buckling their safety belt. Lately, it seems as though every local fatality has been the result of an occupant being ejected from the vehicle during a rollover crash.

 

Or you're going so fast that you're not going to survive period.

 

Change the speed or the angle slightly and you'll get a different result.

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How long did Toyota keep the platform under the previous-generation Camry? How long has the Corolla platform been around?

 

Camry used the same K platform from 2001 - 2017, supposedly with 3 different versions but I doubt there was much difference.

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Or you're going so fast that you're not going to survive period.

 

Change the speed or the angle slightly and you'll get a different result.

 

It also seems as though high-speed accidents around here are coupled with driving under the influence.

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Like I said, the standard changed but the car didnt. The same thing happened with the Escape earlier this year. We all came to the same conclusion, new one on the way next year, not much reason to spend the money and change it.

 

Ford knew the standards for passenger side small offset was coming and had plenty of time to fix the Escape. The cost is rather minimal as well because they did it on the driver side. They just choose not to do the passenger side thinking IIHS will not re-test the Escape one year after it failed the driver side small offset test.

 

Not adding the reinforcement on the passenger side doesn't automatically make the car "unsafe" but it's unnecessary bad PR and Ford got no credit for fixing the driver side after previously failing and incurring the bad PR. If you are going to fix it, fix both sides, don't play stupid games.

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Based on media reports of accidents around here, most fatalities occur because the occupants didn't bother buckling their safety belt. Lately, it seems as though every local fatality has been the result of an occupant being ejected from the vehicle during a rollover crash.

 

It's so irritating to hear reporters talk about a rollover accident where multiple folks were killed and they cite "speed as a factor" but neglect to mention that nobody was wearing seatbelts and were only killed because they were ejected.

 

Speed, on dry streets, is almost never a factor unless you're trying to go around a corner at 100 mph. If you run off the road going around a corner even remotely close to the speed limit then you just lost control or weren't paying attention.

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I know a guy who managed to roll his Honda S2000. He was attempting to take a posted 50 mph curve on a public road at about 85 when he found some loose gravel on the asphalt. Fortunately he walked away from it, but we rag him to this day about the incredible skill it takes to roll a car that is all of 26 inches tall!

Edited by Sevensecondsuv

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I know a guy who managed to roll his Honda S2000. He was attempting to take a posted 50 mph curve on a public road at about 85 when he found some loose gravel on the asphalt. Fortunately he walked away from it, but we rag him to this day about the incredible skill it takes to roll a car that is all of 26 inches tall!

 

And how many folks would say that "speed" was a factor in that accident when clearly it was road debris?

 

If it was posted at 50 he probably could have taken it at 100 without the gravel.

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IIHS is pushing itas own barrow with vehicle safety, it's unfortunate that the aged D3 Explorer

does not meet the new safety test standards but we know that Ford has a new Explorer coming in 12 months.

Previous experience suggest that most new buyers won't be put off from considering Explorer.

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Also remember that Ford knew these crash testes were coming in 2009, even before this current generation of Explorer was on the market. The IIHS lets manufactures know years in advance as to what is coming in the tests.

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Also remember that Ford knew these crash testes were coming in 2009, even before this current generation of Explorer was on the market. The IIHS lets manufactures know years in advance as to what is coming in the tests.

We also know that Mark Fields delayed everything so at the time they were probably planing on having the replacement ready by the time the new test came out

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How long did Toyota keep the platform under the previous-generation Camry? How long has the Corolla platform been around?

 

akirby mentioned details for Camry in post #15. Corolla's New MC platform has been around since 2005. In the U.S., the first Toyota model to use that platform was 2006 RAV4. Corolla started using New MC platform in 2008.

 

Both Camry and Corolla are now using TNGA. Camry for model year 2018. Corolla for model year 2019.

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