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FirefighterGeek

Looking for opinions on care and feeding of my new 2.0L EB

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Just bought a gorgeous 2017 Escape Titanium with the 2.0L Ecoboost. I have a few questions for those of you who've lived with these engines a while and know a bit about them. I'm an old school engine guy, so may be operating on outdated information.

First, the start/stop -- Do you disable yours in stop and go traffic? At a drive through? When you know you won't be sitting long? It seems as though in some of those cases it will stop/start half a dozen times in a couple of minutes. There must be some threshold where it makes sense to disable it. Has anyone done the work of figuring that out? To be clear, I've read about all the hardened and better lubricated starting gear work and battery work they've done, but I'm old school and I have to wonder if it makes sense to disable it in those situations or just trust that smart people at Ford figured that stuff out already.

Second, the Turbo -- Back in the day, we were taught to always idle for a bit after a highway drive to let the oil flow through the turbo's bearings and cool everything down before shutting off the engine. Is that still a thing? Do I want to sit in park and idle for a minute before shutting down? Does the start/stop computer take that into account as well?

Third (and last for now) -- the Battery. In addition to the constant stopping and starting, I notice the accessory outlets are powered on when this machine is shut off. Between that and the computer and networking stuff it does, what if I park it for a few weeks in an airport parking lot? Are people having trouble with these cars draining down? Is there a shut off for all this stuff if the battery drops below a safe starting level?

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No need to disable start/stop unless you just don't like it doing that.

 

Turbos are entirely new and don't need a cool down idle but it won't hurt either.

 

Batteries are a huge problem on all modern vehicles if the car isn't driven for a few days or only driven for short trips. Plan to replace the battery every 3 years or so regardless. I recommend getting a Solar tester and a C-Tek charger/conditioner and using it once every couple of months to keep the battery topped up.

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Thanks for this feedback.

I have a home office in a fairly rural place, so mixed with very short trips are very long ones. Battery life for me is likely to be generally good though I do have trickle charging equipment around that can keep a battery topped off if I leave it for long periods without overcharging. It sounds like if I'm going to leave it in an airport lot for more than a week, I'll want to throw a jump-start pack in the cargo area and leave it there. I've seen batter terminal mounted cut-offs that are designed to prevent long term draw down like that by cutting off power if the batter goes below starting level. They're designed to re-enable the battery when a real draw is detected (like pressing the brake pedal).

That said -- if the battery is totally dead, how the hell would you get into the car? It has no manual door lock. Even the keyless entry code is powered. You can't pop the hood from outside either. There has to be some way to do it. Ford's got smart people thinking of this stuff.

While this isn't the most expensive car I've ever owned, and certainly not driven, the technology is head and shoulders ahead of any other car I've owned. The car is extremely clever and it's going to take a little time to get used to.

 

 

No need to disable start/stop unless you just don't like it doing that.

Turbos are entirely new and don't need a cool down idle but it won't hurt either.

Batteries are a huge problem on all modern vehicles if the car isn't driven for a few days or only driven for short trips. Plan to replace the battery every 3 years or so regardless. I recommend getting a Solar tester and a C-Tek charger/conditioner and using it once every couple of months to keep the battery topped up.

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There is a manual door lock, the key is hidden inside the fob. I've had batteries nearly complete dead before and still had the electric locks work.

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Really? I'll have to find that. I like knowing where such things are. Good to know.

Update: I'll be damned, you're 100% right (never doubted you). Found the key, found where it goes.

There is a manual door lock, the key is hidden inside the fob. I've had batteries nearly complete dead before and still had the electric locks work.

Edited by FirefighterGeek

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RTFM!!

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Very helpful. With the exception the key, which was just kind ad-hoc add on, most of this isn't really in the manual. The manual is really basic about operation and doesn't really offer advice on what the car DOESN'T do well.

RTFM!!

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Do you know how to start the vehicle of the battery in the fob dies? That's in the manual. Along with dozens of other things that you'll never know about unless you read it.

 

Seriously, RTFM. You can get online pdfs at owner.ford.com or www.motorcraftservice.com. They're searchable, too.

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Yeah, I'm reading through it. It's not well written. There are nuggets of critical information mixed in with endless paragraphs from the lawyers and inane instructions for people who have never seen a car before. I'm a software developer, firefighter, and someone who has rebuilt cars and engines -- I was trying to skim it looking for the "new things" that are out of scope from my rapidly aging knowledge. The way the owners manual is laid out it took me ten minutes to find out the type of oil it wants.

The car is very clever, but it's not intelligent.

 

Do you know how to start the vehicle of the battery in the fob dies? That's in the manual. Along with dozens of other things that you'll never know about unless you read it.

Seriously, RTFM. You can get online pdfs at owner.ford.com or www.motorcraftservice.com. They're searchable, too.

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As to to the battery in the fob -- I'll look it up but as someone in the tech field my expectation would be that even if the buttons on the fob don't work, the RFID chip embedded in it should still operate just fine in proximity. RFID chips operate in response to transmitted queries, getting their energy from the microwave radiation of the query itself. As long as the car has power and the key is in proximity the button should still work. If the RFID isn't working then even a physical key would probably not start it because the anti-theft system would fail to find an RFID response it expects.

Do you know how to start the vehicle of the battery in the fob dies? That's in the manual. Along with dozens of other things that you'll never know about unless you read it.

Seriously, RTFM. You can get online pdfs at owner.ford.com or www.motorcraftservice.com. They're searchable, too.

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As to to the battery in the fob -- I'll look it up but as someone in the tech field my expectation would be that even if the buttons on the fob don't work, the RFID chip embedded in it should still operate just fine in proximity. RFID chips operate in response to transmitted queries, getting their energy from the microwave radiation of the query itself. As long as the car has power and the key is in proximity the button should still work.

 

 

Exactly right. But the fob has to be within a few inches of the transceiver. The exact location is your homework assignment.

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Exactly right. But the fob has to be within a few inches of the transceiver. The exact location is your homework assignment.

 

I'll take a look tomorrow when I'm out with the car and book is there. I'm going to take a guess that it's at the point on the steering column marked "key" where a traditional ignition lock cylinder would be. I"m going to guess that because the transceiver will be in the same place, as if it were a vestigial organ, that it was placed by the engineers prior to using this newer system.

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Not even close. In the time it's taken you to log in, read my message and type that reply you could have downloaded the free pdf and found the answer.

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Uh, no, on my 2013 Escape, there is a notch in the right hand side of the steering column. That's where my manual reads to put the key, should the remote battery button need replacing. I'm pretty sure you still need the manual key to get into the door though. But I have the keypad, which should work as long as the battery isn't dead.

 

You may be thinking of the Fusion. That I think goes in the center console.

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Uh, no, on my 2013 Escape, there is a notch in the right hand side of the steering column. That's where my manual reads to put the key, should the remote battery button need replacing. I'm pretty sure you still need the manual key to get into the door though. But I have the keypad, which should work as long as the battery isn't dead.

 

You may be thinking of the Fusion. That I think goes in the center console.

 

I thought they were all in the center console but I think you're right on the Escape.

 

Even MORE reason to RTFM.....

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Two points for me!

Seriously though, thanks. wouldn't have looked that up until I needed it.

 

I thought they were all in the center console but I think you're right on the Escape.

 

Even MORE reason to RTFM.....

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Second, the Turbo -- Back in the day, we were taught to always idle for a bit after a highway drive to let the oil flow through the turbo's bearings and cool everything down before shutting off the engine. Is that still a thing? Do I want to sit in park and idle for a minute before shutting down? Does the start/stop computer take that into account as well?

 

 

No. The EB turbos are liquid cooled and have been designed to create a spontaneous convective circulation of the coolant even after the engine has been turned off.

 

As far as what your supposed to feed the engine...the computer will tune the control parameters automatically depending on the octane rating of the fuel. If you want to know the details google for "ecoboost octane adjustment ratio". In a nutshell it is believed that there is both short and long term learning periods in which the computer can narrow down the OAR after just a single full throttle acceleration, but to fully learn and fine tune the OAR it may take a full tank of gas. The MPG rating is achieved with 87 octane gas, but the published HP and torque ratings are with 93 octane gas.

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