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theoldwizard

EcoBoost, as we know it, faces some big challenges !

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The "basic" EcoBoost technology was "invented" by Bosch and sold to more than just Ford (EU and US). VW is the first to announce one possible solution to the problem !

 

Volkswagen may install diesel filters for gas-powered cars

 

The filters will be used in direct-injection turbocharged engines. Those engines can create more emissions than older, port-injection engines because the newer engines give less time for gasoline to mix with the air in the engine's combustion chamber.

 

 

The "new" 3.5L EcoBoost gets around this by using BOTH direct AND port fuel injectors.

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I have to admit I am more than a bit leery about anything VW is doing these days to try to rehab their image.

 

Toyota is using this type of dual injection system on some of their engines.
What's the advantage then of both direct- and port-injection?

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I have to admit I am more than a bit leery about anything VW is doing these days to try to rehab their image.

 

Toyota is using this type of dual injection system on some of their engines.

What's the advantage then of both direct- and port-injection?

 

Direct injection doesn't allow fuel to touch the backs of the valves whereas port injection does and that helps keep them clean. I'm sure there are some other benefits.

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The other issue is particulates. For example, that's why some diesels have a filter, to trap the particulates.

 

What's been noticed on gas direct injection engines, the particulates are also high. But on port injection, it's better.

 

So the compromise is to use port injection for "normal" engine running. But if you're at a point where more power is needed, it starts adding fuel through the DI ports. At least that's how I understand it. I've been known to be wrong...

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The other issue is particulates. For example, that's why some diesels have a filter, to trap the particulates.

 

What's been noticed on gas direct injection engines, the particulates are also high. But on port injection, it's better.

 

Yes sir! There was a study done in Germany a few years ago that confirmed this. It also found that GDI engines can emit 10 times more fine particulate matter pollution than clean diesel engines with DPF. http://www.transportenvironment.org/sites/te/files/publications/GDI%20Briefing_final_T%26E.pdf

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Yes sir! There was a study done in Germany a few years ago that confirmed this. It also found that GDI engines can emit 10 times more fine particulate matter pollution than clean diesel engines with DPF. http://www.transportenvironment.org/sites/te/files/publications/GDI%20Briefing_final_T%26E.pdf

And from the link provided we find that controlling GDI particles will be a lot easier

and cheaper to accomplish than with diesel engines:

 

Testing performed on behalf of T&E and others shows that without fitting a Gasoline
Particulate Filter (GPF) to the exhaust, GDI cars produce large numbers of particles.
GPFs are cheaper, simpler, more compact and more durable than those used in diesels,
since the higher temperature of the GDI exhaust prevents an accumulation of soot and
enables continuous regeneration of the filter.
The use of a GPF has the potential to reduce particle numbers by a factor of 1000 or more.

 

Edited by jpd80

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And from the link provided we find that controlling GDI particles will be a lot easier

and cheaper to accomplish than with diesel engines:

There is an even cheaper and easier solution. DON'T DO GDI or GTDI !

 

There have been studies done inside Ford that show both have very marginal "benefits" (power, fuel economy) over port injection. In other words, it is mostly marketing hype !

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There is an even cheaper and easier solution. DON'T DO GDI or GTDI !

 

There have been studies done inside Ford that show both have very marginal "benefits" (power, fuel economy) over port injection. In other words, it is mostly marketing hype !

So basically your saying Ford should abandon its Ecoboost engines? For some reason, I don't see that happening.

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I can see DI in a NA not really adding much to the game. But DI and turbo's, it's needed.

 

You would also need a much larger and heavier NA engine to get the same torque the new 3.5 EB is churning out.

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Nothing new here. The supplemental port injectors have been in use for a decade on EU DI gasoline engines. The valve coking issue was already a well known issue in DI engines when the Ecoboost hit the market. Basically Ford screwed the pooch with the Ecoboost engine by not having supplemental port injectors at release.

 

The addition of the GDiPF was an inevitability with the higher particulate emissions this was discussed on the board years ago.

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So basically your saying Ford should abandon its Ecoboost engines? For some reason, I don't see that happening.

Marketing sells cars !

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Nothing new here. The supplemental port injectors have been in use for a decade on EU DI gasoline engines. The valve coking issue was already a well known issue in DI engines when the Ecoboost hit the market. Basically Ford screwed the pooch with the Ecoboost engine by not having supplemental port injectors at release.

Please reference 2007MY EU engine with DI and PFI.

 

The NA release of EcoBoost on the 2010MY 3.5L Taurus was basically a Bosch design. I can not prove it, but I highly doubt that Bosch recommended a second set of injectors and Ford just chose NOT to do it.

Edited by theoldwizard

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Modern GDI has been in use since 1996 the issue with valve coking has been well documented for over a decade.

 

Since 06 Mercedes PSA and Alfa have used a spray directed injection system with a centrally located injector that washes the back of the valve with a short burst on the intake stroke. None of these engines have issues with valve coking. Audi in 13 added a supplemental injector on it's 1.6L (EU Calibrations only) this serves a few purposes easier cold starts, lower NOX, lower particulate emissions and keeps the valves clean.

 

Not only was Ford was late to the party with GDI in the Ecoboost they then used the older and cheaper wall directed injection system that was know to have serous issues with valve coking in turbo applications. Furthermore since these are turbo charged engines you cannot use induction cleaners like on a NA engine as it takes out the turbo's. Ford has NO fix for the valve coking issue short of manual cleaning. Really makes you wonder what clown college they got their power train engineers from, or at the very least the fools that rubber stamped it. People are resorting to catch cans on the PCV systems to collect as much crud as then can so the valves don't coke up really having to resort to that on what is supposed to me Ford's premier engine line. That is what you do on your old worn out POS to keep all crud out of your engine not on what is supposed to be Ford's class leading power plants.

 

Further more the fix for it is idiot simple.. water methanol injection. The vehicles already have a source of it on board....the washer fluid. Winter time washer fluids are generally about 30%-50% methanol it would be simple enough to add, and would just need to be activated at times of higher engine load when blow by is at it's worst this would have the effect of steam cleaning the back of the valves, and washing out induction system with the methanol not to mention it would reduce detonation allowing for more radical timing advance (better economy) and lower NOX emissions.

 

Ya not an ideal situation but far a cheaper solution than pulling an engine apart to clean the valves.

 

There was a time when Ford used the very best of available technology and led the industry, unfortunately that sure that sure has not been the case for a while now.

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Only early DI engines have issues with coking, the later GM HFV6 with DI and Ford's own Focus 2.0DI

as well as all of the later Ecoboost engines have had no real issue with it. Think about it if coking had been

the major issue some think, it would be making headline news but guess what...nada zippo. It's a dead issue.

 

Mazda's own work on GDI and GDIT has shown that a lot of improvement is possible with tailoring DI's combustion

traits over those of simple port injection, it's not the 1990s and 200s anymore, many manufacturers are realizing

that the emissions profile and control afforded by DI is far superior to just squirting fuel into a manifold.

 

The cost of an exhaust particle filter for GDI and GDT is around $50 when first discussed by the EU ten years ago

and with wider spread applications thse days, I'd expect the cost now would be even lower and simply added

to the service schedule.

 

Ford is not going to drop Ecoboost, they see how it has grabbed the public's imagination and now, over 70%

of F150 buyers have switched to ecoboost, pFI V8s are being left behind, GM's 5.3 and 6.2 V8s are now DI

to stay in the game, without it they csimply can't deliver the necessary power and emissions profile.

Edited by jpd80

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