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Pictures don't do 'em justice! There was a bright red Lariat at the dealer when I drove through the other day. I've never seen a better looking truck...absolutely beautiful! And it's like a vault inside when you close the doors. Of course, 2 vehicles down was a sexy black Mustang. Both are tremendous styling hits in my book!

 

I'll take a Red Supercab Lariat 2.7L EB and a Grey ragtop ecoboost mustang with the track pack.

 

That reminds me - I need to go check my lottery ticket.

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I'll take a Red Supercab Lariat 2.7L EB and a Grey ragtop ecoboost mustang with the track pack.

 

That reminds me - I need to go check my lottery ticket.

 

Red SuperCrew Lariat with the 3.5L EB and HD payload package, max tow, etc., and a black coupe with the track pack and auto tranny thanks.

 

You can either wire the funds or just ship the vehicles with your winnings. :)

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Could be worse. Back in the early 50's, Ford of Canada had to ship every Ford/Meteor/Mercury/Monarch convertible sold in Canada to a particular Toronto Ford dealer, which would take the convertible roof apart, re-assemble, re-install and align windows and lifts, all the details. Then the cars were shipped to the selling dealers. By '56 or so, assembly plant quality no longer required the re-do. :)

The good old days...they weren't always that good! It's fun to read the old "Owners Report" series that Popular Mechanics regularly ran from the early 1950s through the 1990s. The problems that people used to tolerate in their brand-new vehicles were quite eye-opening.

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Through the years certain Ford plants had a reputation for consistent outstanding quality and some others were known for shipping poorly built vehicles. This seemed to be a serious problem in the late 1950's.

I think you'll find this story interesting:

http://hamptonroads.com/node/67561

 

The assembly quality of these vehicles was so bad thousands were shipped to a separate Ford assembly plant that did not originally build them to have all the quality issues corrected. "In 1957, dealers angered by the poor workmanship "demanded a quality car," Jimmy Holt says. "Our guys made sure they got it."

Quality was a real problem for Ford during 1957, and not just with the Edsel. There were serious complaints about the build quality of the 1957 Ford and Mercury.

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If the bumper gap is pronounced as badly as that...I would not accept delivery until it was corrected. Don't fall for the "take delivery now and bring it back for an adjustment." ruse....I ain't fallin' for that gag....

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that's it guys....some are worse than others....but once you see it if you were an owner, it would be like picking a scab....

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that's it guys....some are worse than others....but once you see it if you were an owner, it would be like picking a scab....

 

But it happens on SuperCrews too, not just S-Cabs. :hysterical:

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For me personally that bumper doesn't bother me. But of course if you look ar most 2014 f150 the front bumper pushes the upper trim up in the middle making it look out of adjustment. A guy at a local truck accessories shop says none of the truck makers can put a rear bumper on straight.

post-25573-0-85911800-1424388748_thumb.jpg

Edited by fordtech1

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Has Kansas started producing yet? If so, do we have to go through another set early build learning curves?

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For me personally that bumper doesn't bother me. But of course if you look ar most 2014 f150 the front bumper pushes the upper trim up in the middle making it look out of adjustment. A guy at a local truck accessories shop says none of the truck makers can put a rear bumper on straight.

 

"Good enough" ain't going to cut it. That is a $56,000 Platinum and the buyer sure as hell shouldn't have to put up with that sloppy work.

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Has Kansas started producing yet? If so, do we have to go through another set early build learning curves?

Maybe the workers in Kansas City MO will refuse to ship a truck unless the panels are straight.

This sort of thing isn't like a squeak or rattle it's pretty obvious if someone just looks at the truck before it's shipped.

Edited by F250

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Has Kansas started producing yet? If so, do we have to go through another set early build learning curves?

I think Job 1 was Monday for KC

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Maybe the workers in Kansas City MO will refuse to ship a truck unless the panels are straight.

That's a quick way to get fired. You ship what management tells you to.

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Are the bumpers attached on final, or by robots?

 

I've got this mental image of a carrier failing to align the bumper properly---there's no way that workers have to manually hoist that bumper off a rack and hold it steady while bolting it on.

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the bumper is put on by a worker with a hoist before the body is dropped. Its secured by automation after the body is on.

 

That's a quick way to get fired. You ship what management tells you to.

^^^^ This right here...

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Its secured by automation after the body is on.

 

I wonder if this is where the problem's coming in---

 

A reminder that 'to err is human, but to really foul things up, you need a computer.'

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That's a quick way to get fired. You ship what management tells you to.

I guess "Quality is job 1" is just a slogan then.

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DearbornDerek, on 20 Feb 2015 - 02:57 AM, said:snapback.png

Its secured by automation after the body is on.

 

 

I wonder if this is where the problem's coming in---

 

A reminder that 'to err is human, but to really foul things up, you need a computer.'

 

No it isn't the bumper is mounted to the frame long before the cab is dropped.

An occasional misalignment is understandable but Deanh has seen enough problems to start this topic, and not just bumpers.

 

 

2015-Ford-F-150-9.jpg

Edited by F250

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It's easy to be critical of mistakes that should have never left the plant but I wonder how much of that is Ford

knowing that it has to press on with production because the 2014s are selling quickly and replenishing inventory

and customer orders is now taking priority.

 

Sure, this is not right but I have a hunch that Ford is making changes on the fly and the overall numbers of sub-par

F150s may be small in comparison to jobs done well. As Dean said, this now falls on the dealers' shoulders as the

last line before customers spot issues, so I hope Ford opens the cash tin and puts these early rough builds right.

 

In January, Dearborn built 20,681 Alloy body F150s, so they are going like the clappers.....

(FYI Alloy F150 builds were: October 2,688, November 9,067, December 13,625 = 2014 Total 25,380)

Edited by jpd80

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That's the second problem Deanh states Ford will not authorize the dealer to fix the problem.

 

""We have several with blatantly misaligned front bumpers that cannot be adjusted without the ok from Ford. Seems they are aware, but have yet to green light the fix...are there line problems?....sort of explains why they are so slow in coming if Ford is aware of the issues?....""

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No it isn't the bumper is mounted to the frame long before the cab is dropped.

 

That's what he said. It's installed before the cab but is secured (tightened) after the cab is attached.

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