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Ford 2.7 EcoBoost V6 and 5-cylinder 3.0 diesel get dogged on in Ward's 10 Best Engines 2015 list

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YMMV on their reasons given why they think the neither of the 2 should have made the cut.




Here are the other 9 winners in their categories:




At least the 1.0 3-cylinder made it in.


BTW, how much does "76,631" factor into the grand scheme of things when it comes to the truck market?

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Still sceptical that light duty diesels will prove to be that popular in the long run. Especially with Diesel not experiencing the same sort of price drop as gasoline (in my area anyway) and biofuels and natgas still a ways from being readily available. But the Wards award is based on technical merit and there is enough to Dodge's oil burner to warrant recognition of its technical merit.

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GODDAMNIT!!! Drop the 3.2L Powerstroke into the F150 and stick a fork in RAM sales.....who f-ing cares if it cost more....obviously, RAM buyers are not giving a shit about the price premium....

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GODDAMNIT!!! Drop the 3.2L Powerstroke into the F150 and stick a fork in RAM sales.....who f-ing cares if it cost more....obviously, RAM buyers are not giving a shit about the price premium....

Just wait till the 10 speed is out.

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Jason...it is not about more technology.....people equate a diesel with superior MPG and service, they obviously don't give a shit that the return on the investment takes 5X longer to realize....so, Ford needs to stop dilly-dallying and install the 3.2L Powerstroke into F150 and sell 'em.....they will make $$$ on the sales and still sell a ton of Ecoboost powered trucks.....

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Jason...it is not about more technology.....people equate a diesel with superior MPG and service, they obviously don't give a shit that the return on the investment takes 5X longer to realize....so, Ford needs to stop dilly-dallying and install the 3.2L Powerstroke into F150 and sell 'em.....they will make $$$ on the sales and still sell a ton of Ecoboost powered trucks.....

I have to agree. No matter all the facts pointing to the 3.5L EB far superior to the ecodiesel, people still cream all over it. They don't care it cost more, more to maintain, is Vastly underpowered in performance, etc.. They only want a diesel for some God awful reason. I say stuff it in the F150, detune it to get more MPG and shut Ram up.

 

They should fast track it and get MT TOTY for 2016, but then again Nissan will have the 5.0L Cummins next year (2016) so that's a for sure win for TOTY. Maybe they can wait until 2017 :hysterical: :shrug:

Edited by Hydro

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GODDAMNIT!!! Drop the 3.2L Powerstroke into the F150 and stick a fork in RAM sales.....who f-ing cares if it cost more....obviously, RAM buyers are not giving a shit about the price premium....

 

But to do that we have to first ask the question....

 

Do Truck buyers buy the Ram because of its diesel?

 

Or are they simply Ram buyers buying a Ram?

 

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I have to agree. No matter all the facts pointing to the 3.5L EB far superior to the ecodiesel, people still cream all over it. They don't care it cost more, more to maintain, is Vastly underpowered in performance, etc.. They only want a diesel for some God awful reason. I say stuff it in the F150, detune it to get more MPG and shut Ram up.

 

They should fast track it and get MT TOTY for 2016, but then again Nissan will have the 5.0L Cummins next year (2016) so that's a for sure win for TOTY. Maybe they can wait until 2017 :hysterical: :shrug:

Form the construction standpoint another diesel advantage is your truck can use the same fuel as your equipment and don't have to waste time getting to a gas station in the woods, not to mention the whole "no spark plugs" and heavy use durability thing.

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Here is my take. Wards is rubbish. Engines being judged by driving the vehicle around is the most worthless method as you are comparing total powertrain, not just the engine. Ram has a 8speed, F150 has a 6speed. The trans makes a huge difference (my rental had an 8 speed and that car was a rocket ship). Comparing an >8500lb cargo van to a Texas Cadillac truck is not fair either, completely different customer expectations.

 

Lastly I will use the spectrum of women to explain my view on engines. Diesel in a light duty app: She seems responsible, and frugal. But when you spend some time with her your wallet gets drained and there's some baggage there. Ecoboost: Same story but less baggage, but she's fast and smoking hot. V8: She makes a good meatloaf and won't screw you over. A little bigger, yeah but it's in the right places. I'll take the meatloaf.

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Form the construction standpoint another diesel advantage is your truck can use the same fuel as your equipment and don't have to waste time getting to a gas station in the woods, not to mention the whole "no spark plugs" and heavy use durability thing.

 

Any contractor spending upwards of $5k on a -half ton- engine that is less capable than gas equivalents in order to avoid having to buy fuel at two locations is probably not going to be in business very long.

 

And good grief, where *can't* you buy gasoline? Since your employees don't run on diesel, you're going to have to buy food, and where can you buy food without being able to buy gas?

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And speaking of the EcoDiesel in commercial apps:

 

If you're running a Dodge crew cab diesel as a contractor, and you've got four people in the cab of that truck, your payload is, basically, a socket set and some McDonalds carryout.

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How many of the ecodiesels are being sold to real a commercial contractors application? Not many. The diesels are being sold to the retail public.

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Any contractor spending upwards of $5k on a -half ton- engine that is less capable than gas equivalents in order to avoid having to buy fuel at two locations is probably not going to be in business very long.

 

And good grief, where *can't* you buy gasoline? Since your employees don't run on diesel, you're going to have to buy food, and where can you buy food without being able to buy gas?

Go work construction for a while then get back to me on what a contractor wants, because I have. Time is money and many contractors don't have that luxury to go 2 places and workers bring their own for or/and a foodtruck pay a visit. Or the truck itself is the on-site equipment and don't leave the job until the day is over.

 

Ram isn't selling Ecodiesels by accident, yeah ecoboost is God's gift but why Ford limit themself if a diesel is ready to go?. If the numbers isn't adding up that's fine but insult someone's livelihood because they didn't get brand X is over the top.

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Any contractor spending upwards of $5k on a -half ton- engine that is less capable than gas equivalents in order to avoid having to buy fuel at two locations is probably not going to be in business very long.

 

And good grief, where *can't* you buy gasoline? Since your employees don't run on diesel, you're going to have to buy food, and where can you buy food without being able to buy gas?

Yup....In Ovid NY....

 

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It's not the type of engine/transmission that presents a problem with Ram or Nissan, but the rest of the junk that surrounds it. Their products have always been problematic when it comes the rest of the package. Also, my understanding of drivetrains is very limited. Having said that, I thought the idea of the proper transmission, was to keep the engine operating in the optimal power band, and thus achieve the best economy. Tractor trailers have numerous gears for this reason, because of the limited power band. The previous points re: costs are and operational concerns are well taken, but in a light duty pickup that can tow very little, it's just BS.

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Or the truck itself is the on-site equipment and don't leave the job until the day is over.

 

Gets great mileage. :)

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Any contractor spending upwards of $5k on a -half ton- engine that is less capable than gas equivalents in order to avoid having to buy fuel at two locations is probably not going to be in business very long.

 

And good grief, where *can't* you buy gasoline? Since your employees don't run on diesel, you're going to have to buy food, and where can you buy food without being able to buy gas?

And more importantly, if you are a "contractor" of any significance, you are not putting highly taxed on road diesel in your off road equipment. And for sure, you are not putting dyed, non taxed off road diesel in your on road equipment as if you get caught in a road check, the fines you will pay will stick with you for a long time.

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Form the construction standpoint another diesel advantage is your truck can use the same fuel as your equipment and don't have to waste time getting to a gas station in the woods, not to mention the whole "no spark plugs" and heavy use durability thing.

This isn't accurate. Construction equipment usually runs non-highway, dyed diesel to avoid unnecessary paying high excise taxes. Putting that in your pickup is illegal.

 

Editing this as I now see that Bob caught this in the above post.

Edited by TBirdStangSkyliner

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Diesel-fuel prices undermine the Ram's advantage

That's the difference in price between a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline ($2.299) and one of diesel fuel ($3.213) as of this past Monday, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. That price differential makes the one-mile-per-gallon difference between the Ram and the F-150 much more significant.

 

How significant? Assuming 15,000 miles a year, and assuming a constant 22 miles per gallon for the Ford and 23 for the Ram, the Ram's fuel would cost $528.06 more than the Ford's at current prices -- even though the Ram would use less fuel.

 

That gap may close over time. But right now, Ford has a pretty solid fuel-economy case for its new truck -- and even though it might not be talking about fuel economy in its new TV ads, you can bet that it's making that case to its commercial customers in a big way.

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I get great fuel economy in 2.0L Volkswagon TDI Diesel Jetta Sportwagon, and I don't have to add DEF blue or go through regen like my F250. However, I'm not trying to tow anything, just travel A to B. Buy the vehicle you want that will do the job at hand. I believe if you are striving for a compromise of fuel economy and towing capacity in a light duty vehicle, Ford has struck the best compromise. Emission regulations has crippled Diesel powered vehicles from a cost benefit analysis.

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Form the construction standpoint another diesel advantage is your truck can use the same fuel as your equipment and don't have to waste time getting to a gas station in the woods, not to mention the whole "no spark plugs" and heavy use durability thing.

I've never seen non-highway diesel at the same pump as the on-road stuff. Diesel pumps are becoming more common around where I live, though. Good for those who need it. Bad because it always makes the area around the pump(s) so oily.

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Form the construction standpoint another diesel advantage is your truck can use the same fuel as your equipment and don't have to waste time getting to a gas station in the woods, not to mention the whole "no spark plugs" and heavy use durability thing.

 

That's not really the case. Most people with equipment that takes a substantial amount of fuel buy off-road diesel to save on taxes. You can't burn that in a truck.

 

And, it looks like I was already beaten to the punch by two others. Maybe I should read the entire thread before commenting...

Edited by fordmantpw

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